Summer’s Halfway Over, Time for Lammas

Traditionally Lammas, also known as Lughnasadh, is a festival that marks the first harvest of the year. Corn, grain, and apples are all fully grown and, as is typical with Pagan celebrations, this is a holiday to be thankful for all that you have and all that will come to you. No holiday is complete…

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Litha Says Summer is Finally Here

But, it’s raining where I live. Complaints aside, Litha, more commonly known as Midsummer, is easily thought of as a continuation of Beltane. This is still a time to celebrate growth and, as is the case with all Pagan holidays, a time to appreciate nature and all that it gives to us. As always, the…

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Celebrate New Growth on Beltane

Beltane, also known as May Day, happens on May 1 and celebrates the coming growth for the new year (this has a quite literal interpretation considering the holiday’s illicit history!), as well as celebrating the importance of the sun; which is symbolized by fire. Much like Ostara before it, greenery and flowers play an important part…

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Winter is Over, Time for Ostara

Winter is over in theory anyway. Where I live there’s still a lot of snow, cold, and 200,000 mph winds, so I’m not really in a springtime mood. (Funnily enough, I complained about this in my last Pagan holiday post. Go figure.) However, that doesn’t mean we can’t celebrate Ostara; especially if you’ve rejected Catholicism like me.…

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Celebrate the End of Winter with Imbolc

At least, in theory. It’s still bitterly cold and snowy where I live. Moving on from the complaining. Anyway, Imbolc is an early Celtic holiday celebrating that spring is on the way. Think of it as a precursor to Groundhog Day. So, do some spring cleaning. Pack away all of your things from Yule, dust,…

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A Brief How-to on Yule, the OG Christmas

Yes, you read that right. Theologians actually speculate Christ, if he lived, was born sometime in April, so how did we come to celebrate Christmas in December? Because of Pagans. To encourage Pagans to convert to Christianity, early Christians decided to be accommodating and meld pre-existing Pagan holidays with Christian ones. And so, Yule became Christmastide…

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